Tag: aircraft

Updated Florida Form to Report Sales and Use tax on Aircraft

Florida Introduces New Form to Report Sales and Use Tax on Aircraft

The Florida Department of Revenue (FL DOR) has updated its reporting form on the sale and use of aircraft in Florida. Form DR-15AIR (Sales and Use Tax Return for Aircraft) replaces Form DR-42A (Ownership Declaration and Sales and Use Tax Report on Aircraft). The new form provides explicit guidance on when to report taxes on the sale and use of aircraft in Florida.

When Form DR-15AIR Should be Used.

An individual should report sales and use tax on the purchase of aircraft when they don’t pay Florida’s sales tax to the seller. Form DR-15AIR clarifies the three (3) situations when an individual should instead pay a 6% “use” tax:

1.  An individual purchases an aircraft from a person who is not a registered aircraft dealer and the sale or delivery of the aircraft occurs in Florida;

2.  An individual purchases an aircraft in another state, territory of the United States, or District of Columbia and is brought into Florida within six months of the purchase date; or

3.  An individual purchases an aircraft in a foreign country and is brought into Florida at any time.

This use tax is in addition to any county discretionary sales surtax. The discretionary sales tax applies to the first $5,000 of the purchase price and rates vary by county.

When Sales and Use Tax is Due.

Florida Sales and Use Tax
. Taxes Not Included

Florida’s use tax is technically due when an individual brings an aircraft into Florida for use or storage. The corresponding tax returns and tax payments, however, are due only on the 1st day of the month after the actual month when:

1.  The airaft was purchased in Florida;

2.  The aircraft was delivered to a Florida location; or

3.  The aircraft enters Florida for use or storage.

The tax returns and tax payments are late if coming after the 20th in the month they are due. Late returns and payments are penalized a minimum of $50 or 10% of the amount due, whichever is less. Interest is dues on late payments as well.

Exceptions to Sales and Use Tax.

Exceptions to Florida’s sales and use tax on aircraft continue to apply, including:

1.  The value of an aircraft, boat, mobile home, or motor vehicle an individual trades in reduces the taxable purchase amount. The person accepting the trade in and selling the aircraft must be the same.

2.  An individual removes an aircraft purchased in Florida from the state within 10 days after the date of purchase, or 20 days after completion of repairs or alterations.

3.  A credit for taxes pad in another state, territory of the U.S., or Washington D.C. No credit is available for taxes paid in another country.

4.  An exemption from the tax for non-residents of Florida when their aircraft enter and remain in Florida for 20 days or less during the six-month period after aircraft purchase. This exemption also applies to non-resident owned aircraft that enter Florida for the purposes of flight training, repairs, alterations, refitting, or modification.

Ari Good, JD LLM, a tax, aviation and entertainment lawyer, is the Shareholder of Good Attorneys At Law, P.A. He graduated from the DePaul University College of Law in 1997 and received his LL.M. in Taxation from the University of Florida.

Contact us toll free at (877) 771-1131 or by email to info@goodattorneysatlaw.com.

Year End 100% Aircraft Bonus Depreciation

Aircraft Bonus Depreciation
Aircraft bonus depreciation still in sight

From year-end 2011:  “As the holidays approach our thoughts become preoccupied with but one thing: how can I purchase an aircraft and write off 100% of the cost basis in the first year? Well, perhaps not for everyone, but here’s what you need to know: if you purchase an aircraft and place it in service by December 31, 2011 you will qualify for the 100% bonus provision provided you meet all of the other requirements. This is a considerable benefit under any circumstances.

If this is NOT possible, however, and you must place your aircraft in service next year, you are probably still better off than you would have been had you “only” been able to take the 50% bonus. This is because assets placed in service in the fourth quarter of the year do not receive the full first-year depreciation allowance. Your bonus allowance reverts back to 50% for assets placed in service in 2012. By waiting until early next year, you still receive this benefit, but are now able to take the full year MACRS depreciation allowance. In other words, unless the value of your depreciation allowance is considerably greater than it will be next year, you’re better off taking your time and making sure you have done your tax planning carefully, not only at the federal but also at the state – sales tax – level.”

Update 2012:  The good news:  100% bonus depreciation is still with us on qualified aircraft purchases through the end of this year.  What’s “qualified”?  There are several factors, including that you purchase a new (or substantially rebuilt) aircraft, and that you take delivery and place it in service before the end of the year.

The bad news:  This might not be around forever, which as bad news goes is pretty acceptable in my book.

Bonus Depreciation Extended

President Obama last week signed the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010 into law, extending two key aircraft-friendly tax provisions for another year.  This legislation extends the “bonus depreciation” provisions that have been in place for some time that allow the taxpayer to deduct up to 50% of the purchase price of the plane in that year.  This legislation will also modify the separate “expensing” provision that allows up to an additional $50,000.00 deduction.  What remains of the plane’s basis is then further depreciated under the accelerated, five year, MACRS recovery period.  Put together, these provisions allow an aircraft purchaser (including fractional interest purchasers) to deduct the majority of the purchase price of within the first two years.

The taxpayer must qualify for these benefits, and there are some limitations: 

  • These provisions apply only to noncommercial aircraft predominantly used in a trade or business.  Personal use is accounted for separately and should be undertaken with professional tax advice.
  • The expensing allowance, under the new law, phases out dollar for dollar for aircraft over $2M. 
  • Bonus depreciation is permitted only for new aircraft, whose “first use” is in the taxpayer’s hands.  Used or refurbished aircraft do not qualify.  Fractional interests are considered “first used” by the taxpayer at the time of his purchase.
  • You must enter a written binding contract for his purchase of the plane and place a non-refundable deposit with the seller by the end of this year.  You would have to begin using the aircraft by the end of next year.
  • Depreciation deductions are “recaptured” when the aircraft is sold.  This can be deferred for some time either by continued ownership or by exchanging the fractional interest for another at a later time.  The real tax savings is the time value of the money not paid in taxes during this period.

Ari Good, Esq.

NBAA’s Handy State Tax Guide

The National Business Avaition Association publishes a very handy “quick reference” tool to state laws concerning aircraft sales and use tax, aircraft registration, fuel tax and related tax issues. This service is free to NBAA members with usernames and passwords to www.nbaa.org. This service resembles, though certainly doesn’t replace, a similar compilation available through publisher Conklin & DeDecker.

Whatever resource you use, however, must be current as to recent tax law changes. Florida only recently, for example, created new provisions governing sales and use tax applied to aircraft returned here within 180 days of purchase. Contact a qualified aircraft tax advisor for details and the most recent updates. Also visit our website, at https://www.goodattorneysatlaw.com/aviation.html.

Substantiating Aircraft Business Use

On audit an examiner will consider the degree to which you have documented your business use. This will include not only your flight logs but receipts, meeting records, and other evidence of the business purpose for the plane. Duration also plays a part, especially for “mixed purpose” trips to pleasant destinations. The “predominant” purpose for a trip must be for business, that is, at least the majority of the majority of the days must have been spent on business activities, documented as such. For example, your trip to Telluride might have both business and personal pleasure aspects (it should). Just be sure that you can articulate the business aspects of this trip.